Home  -  Sitemap  -  Testimonials  -  Blog     My Hotlist My Hotlist                My Account   ( Sign-in )    
4x4cb .com
UK CB Radio Specialists
Tel: 01306 881137
Browse Products My Shopping Basket / Checkout
Package DealsSpecial OffersAerialsPMR446
Articles About Us
Contact Us
DeliveryAdviceInstallingFAQsLinks
UK CB Radio Specialists - Expert Advice, Competitive Prices & knowledgeable staff, Est 1996
4 X 4 CB
Search for     in             Advanced Search
UK CB Radio Specialists - Expert Advice, Competitive Prices & knowledgeable staff, Est 1996

Advice Pages   UK and EU bands compared
12v / 24v Autoswitching   |    Advice on Accessories   |    Advice on Buying   |    Advice on Choosing   |    Advice on Installing   |    Base Station CB   |    CB Features and Facilities explained   |    CB For Car Enthusiast Clubs & Groups   |    CB For Caravanners   |    CB For Farms and Businesses   |    CB For Motorhomes & Campers   |    CB Lingo and slanguage   |    Choosing an EC-990 Echo Chamber   |    Groundplane / Earth connection / Artificial Ground   |    Handheld CB's   |    Handsfree Legislation   |    History of CB   |    How To Use An SWR Meter   |    Interference   |    PMR446 Licence Free   |   

The UK and EU bands compared...

The UK Band This was the first band to be made legal (in 1981), and the majority of users still spend most of their time on this band. The majority of “old” CB sets in use have 40 channels on the UK band.

Channel 19 is the mobile calling channel, where you can get traffic reports and radio reports (to find out if everything is working ok) along with general conversation, although some of the language can get a bit ripe!

Channel 9 is designated as the emergency channel, although many areas no longer have an active monitoring organisation.

Channel 14 used to be the calling channel for CB users at home, and although it’s still used in some parts of the country, many “homebase” CB’ers now use channel 19.

The EU or "European" Band This band is known under a number of names... EU Band, European Band, CEPT, "The Mids" - they all mean the same. It is common throughout Europe.

This band usually has fewer people on it, so attracts those who prefer to have a more private channel (as private as it can be, on a public radio service !). Those wanting fewer interruptions often use this band - event marshals, or a ‘laning convoy are less likely to have anyone come up on the channel, wondering what you are doing !

The only draw back is that the channels are shared with the rest of Europe, which can mean some interesting long distance contacts, but also a certain amount of interference from foreign stations. This interference varies within short and long term weather cycles, getting worse on sunny summer days, and is affected by the 11 year sunspot cycle which peaked in 2001, so is on the decline now but can still occasionally cause a few problems.



Search for     in             Advanced Search

PayPal Payments by PayPal

CB Radio Products  |  Search  |  Information  |  My Basket  |  Checkout

Terms & Conditions  |   My Account  |  Login  |  Contact Us  |  Sitemap  |  Home
 
Sharman Multicom Approved DealerMidland Approved Dealer
Member of the Federation Of Small BusinessesCommunication Eleven
© Copyright 2017, Communication Eleven